Environment Scientists say extreme storms will be "new normal," U.N. chief warns

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  1. tom_mai78101

    tom_mai78101 The Helper Connoisseur / Ex-MineCraft Host Staff Member

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    UNITED NATIONS -- Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is heading to the hurricane-battered Caribbean, where he said Wednesday that scientists predict the extreme storms during this year's Atlantic hurricane season "will be the new normal of a warming world."

    The U.N. chief told reporters that Hurricane Irma, which devastated Barbuda, was a Category 5 storm for three consecutive days -- "the longest on satellite record" -- and its winds that reached 300 kilometers per hour for 37 hours were "the longest on record at that intensity."

    Hurricanes Harvey and Irma marked the first time two Category 4 storms made landfall on the United States mainland in the same year, Guterres said, and Hurricane Maria, a Category 5 storm, followed up by decimating Dominica and devastating Puerto Rico.

    The secretary-general said "scientists are learning more and more about the links between climate change and extreme weather."

    A warmer climate "turbocharges the intensity of hurricanes," which pick up energy as they move across the ocean, he said. "The melting of glaciers, and the thermal expansion of the seas, means bigger storm surges" and with more people living along coastlines "the damage is, and will be that much greater."

    Read more here. (CBS News)
     

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