Report Study: Americans are retiring later, dying sooner and sicker in-between

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  1. tom_mai78101

    tom_mai78101 The Helper Connoisseur / Ex-MineCraft Host Staff Member

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    The U.S. retirement age is rising, as the government pushes it higher and workers stay in careers longer.

    But life spans aren't necessarily extending to offer equal time on the beach. Data released recently suggest Americans' health is declining and millions of middle-age workers face the prospect of shorter, and less active, retirements than their parents enjoyed.

    Here are the stats: The U.S. age-adjusted mortality rate -- a measure of the number of deaths per year -- rose 1.2 percent from 2014 to 2015, according to the Society of Actuaries. That's the first year-over-year increase since 2005, and only the second rise greater than 1 percent since 1980.

    At the same time that Americans' life expectancy is stalling, public policy and career tracks mean millions of U.S. workers are waiting longer to call it quits. The age at which people can claim their full Social Security benefits is gradually moving up, from 65 for those retiring in 2002 to 67 in 2027.

    Almost one in three Americans age 65 to 69 is still working, along with almost one in five in their early 70s.


    Read more here. (Daily Herald)
     

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