User's Guide in StarEdit

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User's Guide in StarEdit​
by jonadrian619

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Welcome to the world of the Starcraft Campaign Editor, which allows you to learn the basics and advanced in the StarEdit map editor for Starcraft maps. For beginners, get to this thread. Advanced users may take a peek in this tutorial to develop their mapping skills in starcraft.

The tutorial is good for StarEdit newbies and users just to give lot's of tutorials for those people.
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The tutorial contains a lot of topics each with information in how to do it. These tutorials will help you know more about the StarEdit map editor and it's uses, components and advantages.
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Basic StarEdit Tutorials: Let's Begin!!!

First Tutorial:
Creating a Map
- In the File menu, select New. You will see the New Scenario dialog.
Use the pull-downs to select the dimensions for your map. The default setting is for square maps. Uncheck the Square Map checkbox to set the height and width to independent values.
The next step is to select a Tileset. The tileset determines which terrain types are available on the map. For example, the Ash World tileset includes rocky ground, craters, and lava floes, while the Jungle World contains grass, trees and ancient ruins.

Finally, you have the option of selecting a Default Terrain. When the map appears, it will be filled with the selected terrain type.
Note: The map dimensions and tileset cannot be changed without creating a new map.

Saving a Map
- In the File menu, select Save. The editor defaults to saving in the Starcraft maps folder.
Although you can select a different folder, you should be aware that Starcraft will only play maps located under the Starcraft maps folder.
Before you can save a map, it must meet the following requirements:

· Each map must have at least two active players. Neutral and Rescuable players are not considered active.
· Each player must have a Start Location.
· At least one player must be under Human control.
· Active Computer controlled players cannot be on the same Force as Human controlled players.
· Each player must not exceed two hundred Unit Slots.

Opening an Existing Map
- In the File menu, select Open. Select the map you wish to open. After a moment, it will appear in the main window.

StarEdit Tutorials:

1) Map Navigation
The main window shows only a portion of the entire map. To view other areas, you can use the arrow keys on the keyboard or the scrollbars on the main window.

You can also click and drag in the Mini Map to rapidly scroll your view.

2) Using the Mini-Map
The Mini Map is located to the left of the main window and displays a view of the entire map. Units and resources on the map are color-coded:

Red
Player 1

Dark Blue
Player 2

Teal
Player 3

Purple
Player 4

Orange
Player 5

Brown
Player 6

White
Player 7

Yellow
Player 8

Light Blue
Neutral Units (Resources, Critters, Power Ups and unattached Add Ons)

You can click and drag in the Mini Map to rapidly scroll your view in the main window.

3) Using the Tool Tree
When you first run the editor, your cursor starts as a diamond-shaped terrain brush. This cursor takes on different forms depending on the brush you select. Brushes are used in the main window to paint terrain, place units, or add Doodads to the map. You select brushes from the Tool Tree located to the left of the main window.
The Tool Tree is a list of folders with a complete list of terrain and unit brushes, organized by type.

Terrain: All the terrain types available in this map’s tileset.
Neutral Units: These include resources, critters, and power-ups.
Players 1-8: The units available for each player depend on the race you have selected for that player.

When you select a brush from the Tool Tree, your cursor changes to reflect your current selection. You can then use this brush to paint over the map in the main window.
You can also use the Brush Palette to select terrain and unit brushes.

4) Using the Brush Palette
When you first run the editor, your cursor starts as a diamond-shaped terrain brush. This cursor takes on different forms depending on the brush you select. Brushes are used in the main window to paint terrain, place units, or add Doodads to the map. You select brushes from the floating window called the Brush Palette.
The Brush Palette contains icons corresponding to terrain types and units. You can select brushes by clicking on these icons.
Note: If you hold the cursor over an icon, the brush name will appear in a Tool Tip.

The brushes are divided into several categories including terrain, resources and units. You can use the pull-down at the top of the Brush Palette to choose a category.
It is possible to have more than one Brush Palette open at a time. In the Window menu, select New Brush Palette to open a new Brush Palette.
Note: The Brush Palette will only allow you to place units for the current player. Use the Player menu to select the current player. You can also use the Tool Tree to select terrain and unit brushes.

5) Layers (Terrain, Doodad, Unit, Location, Fog of War)

Maps consist of several elements: terrain, doodads, units, locations and the fog of war. Each of these elements has been separated into a distinct layer.

Terrain.

While working in the Terrain layer, your cursor will be the diamond-shaped terrain brush. You can use this brush to paint terrain. When placing terrain, you can click multiple times in the same location to cycle through artwork variations.

Doodad

Trees, craters, ramps and other unique terrain features are Doodads. While working in the Doodad layer, you can place, select and delete doodads. Use the Doodad Palette to choose a doodad brush.

Unit

Buildings, units and resources are all placed in the Unit layer. While working in the Unit layer, you can place, select, delete and modify properties for units.

Location

Locations are rectangular regions used with Triggers. This is an advanced feature that is not required to make a map. Locations are only visible when the Location layer is the current layer.

Fog of War

In Starcraft, the area that is no longer in the vision of any of your units or buildings is called the “Fog of War.” While working in the Fog of War layer, you can mark areas of fog as fully or partially obscured. The Fog of War layer must be set separately for every player. The fog is only visible when the Fog of War layer is the current layer. Layers can be selected using the Layer menu or by right-clicking in the main window and using Layer in the pop-up menu.

Note: You may only modify and select elements while in their current layer. For instance, Doodads cannot be selected when you are in the Unit layer.

6) Using the Grid
From the Edit menu, select Show Grid. When Show Grid is checked, a grid of black lines will appear over the map.
You can use the grid to align doodads, buildings and resources over terrain.

7) Changing Terrain
In the Layer menu, select Terrain to make sure you are in the Terrain layer.
Note: Setting your brush to a terrain type using the Tool Tree or Brush Palette automatically puts you in the Terrain layer.
In the main window, you can click to place individual terrain tiles on the map or click and drag to fill in large areas with the currently selected terrain type. If you hold the cursor over a particular location, you can click multiple times to cycle through any artwork variations for that terrain type.

Terrain is either passable or impassable:
Passable: You can place units on this terrain, and units can cross this terrain in the game. This includes terrain such as dirt, grass and concrete.
Impassable: You cannot place units on this terrain, and units cannot cross this terrain in the game. This includes terrain such as cliffs, walls and water.

Terrain is also buildable or unbuildable:
Buildable: You can place buildings on this terrain, and players can build on this terrain in the game.

Unbuildable: You cannot place buildings on this terrain, and players cannot build on this terrain in the game.
Note: Doodads and Units can be affected by changes to the terran underneath them. For example, if you change the terrain beneath a building to an unbuildable terrain type, the building will be removed.

8) Placing Units
In Starcraft, each unit is assigned to a particular player by color. For example, all units with blue team colors belong to the blue player.
When you place units in the main window, they belong to the current player. There are three ways to change the current player:

· Go to the Player menu and select a Player to make it the current player.
· Select a brush from one of the player folders of the Tool Tree. That player is now the current player.
· Press a number key corresponding to a player number. That player is now the current player, and the Brush Palette
changes to display units for that particular player.

Note: The current player is only relevant for placing units; it does not affect terrain.

To select a unit brush, you can use either the Tool Tree or the Brush Palette. When using the Tool Tree, select a unit brush from the folder of the appropriate player. When using the Brush Palette, select a unit category in the pull-down at the top of the Brush Palette and then click on a unit brush button. The Brush Palette will only allow you to place units for the current player.

Note: Each player defaults to a particular race. For example, Player 1 (the red player) defaults to Terran. You cannot place units of a different race for a player.

Once you select a unit brush, you can click or click and drag in the main window to place units for the current player. You can only place units on terrain marked as passable. A green outline appears around the unit brush if you can place a unit; a red outline appears if you cannot.

Note: You can change the player assignment for units after you have placed them.

9) Selecting Units
You can select any units visible in the main window. You must be in the unit layer and have an empty selection cursor:

To select the unit layer
In the Layer menu, select Unit.

To clear a brush
Right-click or press the [ESC] key. This leaves an empty selection cursor.

To select a unit
Click on the unit you want to select.

To select multiple units
Click and drag a selection rectangle around the units you want to select.

To add to a selection
Hold [SHIFT] and click on or drag a selection rectangle around the units you want to select.

To remove from a selection
Hold [SHIFT] and click on or drag a selection rectangle around the units you want to deselect.

10) Unit Properties
Every unit on the map can be customized using the Unit Properties dialog. You can alter ownership, hit points, resources and other settings relevant to a given unit. Each unit may have different settings assigned to it.
There are three ways to access a selected unit’s properties:

· Double-click on a single unit or hold down [SHIFT] while double clicking on a group selection.
· Right-click in the main window to bring up the pop-up menu and select Properties.
· Go to the Edit menu and select Properties.

The Unit Properties dialog contains several options:

Owner: If the unit may be assigned to a player, you can use this field to select the owner from this pull-down control.

Hit Point %: If the unit has hit points, you can reduce its starting hit points by specifying a percentage of the maximum for the unit. For example, if you set the Hit Point % for a Marine to 75%, the Marine would begin the game with 30 of 40 hit points.

Shield Point %: If the unit has shields, you can reduce its starting shield points by specifying a percentage of the maximum for the unit.

Energy %: If the unit has an energy bar, you can reduce its starting energy by specifying a percentage of the maximum for the unit.

Resources: If the unit is a Mineral Field, Vespene Geyser or refinery, you can use this field to set the total resources it contains.

In Hanger: If the unit holds Interceptors or Scarabs, you can use this field to set how many it starts with. (Values higher than 4 for Interceptors will be ignored unless the Carrier Capacity upgrade has been developed. Values higher than 5 for Scarabs will be ignored unless the Reaver Capacity upgrade has been developed.

Burrowed: If the unit can burrow, you can use this checkbox to set whether or not it starts the game burrowed. (Only Zerg ground units can burrow, and they can only do so once Burrowing has been developed. If you want to start a unit burrowed, you must set the Burrowing special ability to researched.

In Transit: If the unit is a Terran building that can fly, you can use this checkbox to set whether it starts in the air or on the ground.

Cloaked: If the unit can cloak, you can use this checkbox to set whether or not it starts the game cloaked. (Only the Terran Wraith and Terran Ghost can cloak, and they can only do so once cloaking has been developed. If you want to start a unit cloaked, you must set the appropriate cloaking special ability to research.

Invincible: You can use this checkbox to make the unit invincible. In addition to being immune to damage, units set to Invincible cannot be the target of attacks or spells and are ignored by computer controlled units.

Hallucinated: You can use this checkbox to make a unit a Hallucination. Hallucinations set in this way are identical to those created using the High Templar hallucination spell: They have a limited life-span and take double-damage from attacks.

Note: Properties that do not apply to any of the selected units appear grayed out and cannot be modified. Properties that apply to at least one of the selected units can be modified. Units will ignore any property settings that cannot apply to them.

11) Unit Ownership
In Starcraft, each unit is assigned to a particular player by color. For example, all units with blue team colors belong to the blue player.
When placing units in the Campaign Editor, you can use either the Tool Tree or the Brush Palette:

· If you are using the Tool Tree, you can place units for a different player by selecting a brush under that player’s folder.
· If you are using the Brush Palette, you must first change the selected player. You can do this by selecting a player in the Player menu or by pressing the corresponding number key.

To change a unit’s owner, select the unit or units you want to reassign and press a number key corresponding to a player. The units will change ownership to that player. Alternatively, you can use the Player menu instead of a number key. You can also change unit ownership in the Unit Properties dialog.

Note:

Start Locations cannot change ownership.

You cannot assign a unit of one race to a player of a different race.

You cannot assign a unit to a player if it would cause that player to use more than 200 Unit Slots.

12) Deleting Items
There are several ways to delete your current selection:

· In the Edit menu, select Clear.
· Press [DELETE].
· Right-click in the main window and select Clear in the pop-up menu.

Selected units, doodads and locations can all be deleted in this way. Keep in mind that you must be in the appropriate Layer to select an item.

Terrain and the Fog of War can neither be selected nor deleted. You must paint over them in order to remove them.

13) Start Locations
Each player in the map requires a Start Location. For human players, Start Locations determine where the player’s screen will be centered when the mission starts. In game types other than “Use Map Settings”, the Start Location determines where the player’s initial units are located.
Start Locations can be found under each player’s folder in the Tool Tree or under the Start Location category of the player’s Brush Palette. Once you have the Start Location as a brush, you may place it with the following restrictions:

· Start Locations must be placed on buildable terrain.
· If there are resources nearby, the Start Location must be placed at least three tiles away from them.
· There can be only one Start Location for each player.
· Start locations may not overlap each other.
· Start locations cannot change owner.

A quick way to center the main window on the current player’s Start Location is to go to the Player menu and select Go to Start Location.

Note: Technically, Start Locations are treated as units.

14) Resources
There are two types of resources in Starcraft: Mineral Fields and Vespene Geysers. Players extract these resources during the game to pay for buildings, units and upgrades. Players can also start with a set amount of minerals and Vespene gas at the beginning of the game.
Resources are treated and placed as units. Resource brushes can be found under the Neutral Units folder of the Tool Tree or under the Resources category of the Brush Palette.

Note: The three Minerals Fields are identical except for appearance.
You may place resources on the map as you would other units.
Mineral Fields have a default value of 1500 resources while Vespene Geysers have a default value of 5000 resources. You can change the value for any individual resource through its Unit Properties.

Vespene Geysers can be found in the unit brushes. Assimilators, Refineries and Extractors also act as Vespene Gysers automatically built.

Also... When a Vespene Geyser is depleted, the player can still harvest it using Probes, SCV's or Drones, but the gas harvested by the workers decreases.

15) Doodads
Trees, craters, ramps and other unique terrain features are Doodads. While working in the Doodad layer, you can place, select and delete doodads.
In the Layer menu, selecting Doodad brings up a Doodad palette. The Doodad Palette contains all of the doodads that are available for the map’s tileset. Each Doodad is associated with a particular type of terrain and can only be placed on that terrain type. For instance, in the Badlands tileset, ramps can only be placed on Cliffs. The Doodad palette organizes the Doodads according to their terrain types.

The pull-down at the top of the Doodad Palette lets you select a terrain type and display its associated Doodads. Using the slider bar on the right, you can scroll through the different doodads for the current terrain type. Click on the image of the doodad to select it as your brush.
Note: Some terrain types listed in the Doodad Palette, such as walls and cliffs, are not found in the Brush Palette. These are transition terrain types created automatically by the editor when you lay out terrain.

Doodads have restrictions on where they can be placed on the map. Your cursor will indicate if you can place a Doodad at the current location by highlighting itself in green or red. A solid green highlight means you can place the Doodad in the current location. A red, or partially red, highlight indicates that the terrain in the red location is inappropriate for the Doodad.
You will need to experiment when placing doodads. Some doodads, such as stairs and bridges, have very specific requirements. If you have trouble placing a doodad, change the terrain underneath it or find another location.

To clear a Doodad brush and return to the normal selection cursor, press [ESC] or right-click.
To delete a Doodad from the map, select it, then press [DELETE].

16) Doors and Turrets
The Doors and Turrets of the Installation tileset can be enabled or disabled. An enabled door is closed and blocks movement and line of sight, while a disabled door is open and allows free movement. An enabled Turret will pop up and attack enemy units within its range, while a disabled Turret will remain concealed.
While in the Doodad layer, you can toggle the starting state of a Door or Turret by double clicking on it in the main window.

You may also use the “Set Doodad State” trigger action to change the state of a Door or Turret during the game. You will need to draw a location over the Doodad that you want to affect.
Note: Turret Doodads can also be assigned to a player. To assign a turret to a player, select the turret and press the number key corresponding to a player. The turret will provide sight for the player and, if enabled, will attack the player’s enemies.

17) Locations
Locations are used to mark and identify specific areas of the map. Players never see locations, since they are used internally by the Trigger system.
In the Layer menu, select Location. You can then click and drag to create a new location. You can click in an open area to create another location or click on an existing location to select it. Click and drag on a location to re-position it, or click and drag on any of the corner or side hotspots at the edges to resize it.

The first location you create will be called “Location 0”. The second will be called “Location 1” and so on. You can rename a location in the Location Properties dialog. There are several ways to open this dialog:

· Double-click on a location.
· Select a location and press [ENTER].
· Select a location and then in the Edit menu, select Properties.
· Select a location, right-click in the main window, and select Properties from the pop-up menu.

Location Properties

In the Location Properties dialog, you will see a text field with the location name and six checkboxes.

You can name a location by typing its name in the text field. When you use a Trigger with a location, you will refer to the location by this name.

Note: Giving multiple locations the same name is not recommended since that makes it difficult to identify the locations.

The checkboxes allow you to restrict a location to certain elevations on the map. There are six checkboxes:

Low – If this is checked, the location will include ground units in low terrain.
Mid – If this is checked, the location will include ground units in mid terrain.
Hi – If this is checked, the location will include ground units in high terrain.
Low Air – If this is checked, the location will include air units directly above low terrain.
Mid Air – If this is checked, the location will include air units directly above mid terrain.
High Air – If this is checked, the location will include air units directly above high terrain.

You may restrict a location to any combination of elevations. This becomes useful when setting Triggers. As an example: If you wanted a Trigger to check for air units in a location, but not ground units, you would select all three Air elevations and disable the rest.

To delete a location, select it and press [DELETE].
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Scenario Tutorials:

1) Game Types: Map Settings vs. Melee
When you create a game in Starcraft, you can use the Game Type pull-down to determine how the map will be played. The game types fall into two categories: “Use Map Settings” and everything else.

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Use Map Settings:
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Terrain and Doodads are used

Triggers and Locations are used

All units are used.

Forces and Player Settings are used.

Global Settings are used

Fog of War layer is used.

Computer controlled players defend themselves but do not build or attack unless assigned an AI script.

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Melee and all other game types:
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Terrain and Doodads are used.

Triggers in the map are replaced with Triggers specific to the game type. Locations are ignored.

Power-ups, units and buildings are removed from the map. Resources and critters are used.

Forces and Player Settings are ignored. Races are user selectable. All players with Start Locations start with standard starting forces at the site of the start location.

Global Settings are ignored. Default Starcraft statistics are used.

Fog of War layer is ignored. The entire map starts fully obscured for all players

Computer controlled players automatically use the Custom AI script


If you want people to play the map using the “Use Map Settings” game type, it is recommended that you put “(USE MAP SETTINGS)” as the first line of its description.

2) Setting Scenario Properties
In the Scenario menu, select Properties to open the Scenario Properties dialog. The name and description you provide in this dialog are used to describe the map to players considering creating or joining a game with this map.

Name

You can enter a name for the map in this field. The name will appear as part of the map information display in Starcraft. By default, the scenario name is set to “Untitled Scenario.”
Note: The scenario name is not the same as the map’s filename. The filename is set when the map is saved.

Description

You can enter a brief description of your map in this field. The description will appear as part of the map information display in Starcraft. By default, the scenario description reads “Destroy all enemy buildings.”
If you want people to play the map using the “Use Map Settings” game type, it is recommended that you put “(USE MAP SETTINGS)” as the first line of the description.

3) Starting Resources
Triggers are used to set the starting resources of any player. When you first create a new map, it has three triggers by default: The first one sets the starting resources for all players to 50 Ore. The other two deals with victory and defeat conditions.
In the Scenario menu, select Triggers to open the Triggers dialog. Select the trigger that says “Modify Resources for the Current Player…” Click the Modify button. A dialog with three tabs – Players, Conditions and Actions – will appear. Select the Actions tab. With the modify resources action selected, click the Modify button. Click on the blue, underlined “50” and select a new value.

As with all triggers, the new starting resources triggers will only take affect if the map is played using the “Use Map Settings” game type. It is possible, using more sophisticated triggers, to start different players with different resources or to change a player’s resources in the middle of the game.

4) Mission Briefing (For Missions and Campaigns)
A Mission Briefing is shown before any game played with the “Use Map Settings” game type. The briefing is an opportunity to explain any special rules that will be in effect during the game and to establish the tone and story for the game. If the map is a multiplayer map, each player or group of players can have a different mission.
The interface for creating a Mission Briefing is based on the interface for defining Triggers.

In the Scenario menu, select Mission Briefings to open the Mission Briefings dialog. Click the New button. The Mission Briefing wizard will appear.
The first dialog in the Mission Briefing wizard allows you to select which players will receive the briefing. Select the players or force you want to receive the briefing and click the Next button.
The next dialog allows you to define the Mission Briefing Actions. To add an Action, click the New button.

The following Actions are available in Mission Briefings:

MISSION OBJECTIVES – This action allows you to enter text explaining the mission objectives. This text is displayed in the OBJECTIVES pane in the lower left of the briefing room. It also appears in the game if the player selects Mission Objectives from the game menu. This is, of course, just text. It is up to you to make sure that the Triggers in the game are consistent with this text.

TEXT MESSAGE – This action allows you to display text in the center pane in the briefing room. Text messages too long to fit in the pane will automatically scroll. Be sure to specify a long enough duration. If you want to have one text message display after another, use a WAIT command between them. Otherwise, the second text message will immediately replace the first.

PLAY WAV – This action allows you to play a pre-recorded sound file. Use this action to incorporate speech, music, and sound effects into your briefings.

SHOW PORTRAIT – There are four slots for portraits in the briefing room. You can use this action to display any portrait from the game in any of the four slots. You should SHOW PORTRAIT in a slot before using the DISPLAY
SPEAKING PORTRAIT action.

DISPLAY SPEAKING PORTRAIT – Use this action to highlight one of the slots and make the portrait in it use its talk animation. You can use this action with PLAY WAV to make characters in the briefing appear to talk. Remember to SHOW PORTRAIT in a slot before using the DISPLAY SPEAKING PORTRAIT action.

HIDE PORTRAIT – Use this action to clear a portrait slot.

TRANSMISSION – This action combines the functionality of PLAY WAV, TEXT MESSAGE, DISPLAY SPEAKING
PORTRAIT and WAIT. In most cases, using the TRANSMISSION action is preferable to using the actions separately.

WAIT – This action causes a delay before other actions can take place. It is usually a good idea to have a WAIT after a TEXT MESSAGE command. The WAIT command can also be used to put dramatic pauses between lines of dialogue.

Note: Place a WAIT Action at the end of any multiplayer mission briefing. The WAIT will compensate for speed variances in processors and ensure that all players can see the mission briefing.

Actions execute in order from top to bottom. You can use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to re-order the Actions as necessary.

5) Mission Objectives
Mission objectives remind players of what they are supposed to accomplish. The SET OBJECTIVES trigger allows you to embed these objectives into your map where players can examine them.

There is no trigger to display mission objectives during the game. Should you wish to alert players to an existing or new objective, use the DISPLAY TEXT MESSAGE trigger.

Note: Mission objectives are merely text. You must use Triggers with the Victory and Defeat Actions to change the victory and defeat conditions.

6) Forces
Forces provide an easy way to organize different players in a scenario. You can also uses Forces to assign starting alliances between different players or to create Triggers that only affect one Force or another. Usually, it’s a good idea to separate opposing players into different Forces. When players join a scenario game with Forces, they will see their Force name listed in the pre-game chatroom and can join any Force with an open human slot.
By default, all players are a part of the same Force. Note that computer-controlled players and human players cannot be on the same Force. To assign a player to a different Force, open up the Forces dialog and drag the player’s name to the Forces box that you want them to join. You can also rename the Forces from the Forces dialog, and set several options for each Force.

The different options available for Forces are:

Allies – All players in the Force start out allied with each other, and their units will not attack each other.

Allied Victory – All players in the Force start with Allied Victory turned on. Allied Victory settings affect the Opponents Condition. If you want to make a map that allows for allied victory, you should use the Opponents Condition in your Victory Triggers.

Random Start Location – All players in the Force will be assigned a random starting location.

Shared Vision – All players in the Force start out with Shared Vision turned on. Each player can see everything that the other players see, including cloaked and hidden units.

Note that these options (other than Random Start Location) are identical to the options in the Diplomatic Settings in the game. Players in the same Force can change their own settings once they are in the game.

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Player Settings Tutorial:

1) Player Settings: Overview
Player settings allow you to set properties such as the race of a given player, whether computer or human controls it, and what technologies or special abilities are available to it. Using the player settings for units, upgrades and special abilities, you can control the technology tree or upgrade path for each player.
In the Player menu, select Settings. You will see a dialog appear with four tabs across the top: Properties, Units, Upgrades and Special Abilities.

Note: Player settings only apply to games where the game creator has selected the “Use Map Settings” game type

2) Player Settings: Properties
This panel allows you to select the race and control type for each player. The players list-box shows the team color, race and control type for each player. By highlighting a player in the list-box, you can change the settings for the highlighted player.

Race

The radio buttons determine the race of the highlighted player. You can set any players to Terran, Zerg or Protoss. The fourth option, User Selectable, is only available for human controlled players. The User Selectable setting lets players pick their own race before starting the map.
Note: In the Campaign Editor, a player of one race cannot control units of a different race. If you change a player’s race, units will be removed from the map as necessary. Players with User Selectable race always start the game with four workers and a colony center and cannot have units placed in the Campaign Editor.

Control Type

The pull-down to the right of the radio buttons allows you to set the control type for the highlighted player. There are four control types: Human, Computer, Rescuable and Neutral.

· By default, all players are Human-controlled. In a multiplayer game, users can play as any side marked as human-controlled.
· Computer-controlled units are hostile to all human-controlled units and will attack on sight, but they will not build up or attack unless assigned an AI Script.
· Until they are rescued, Rescuable units do not move or attack, and computer-controlled units ignore them. Once rescued by a human player, they change to human control. If a colony center is rescued, all units belonging to that side are also rescued.

· Neutral units will not do anything to any other players unless they are attacked. Once they have been attacked, they mark the attacking player as an enemy and will defend themselves.

Human and Computer players cannot be on the same force. For more information, see Forces.

Before you can save, at least two players on a map must be active players. (Only Human and Computer players are considered active players.)

3) Player Settings: Units
This panel lets you specify which units are available to each player. On the left side of the panel is a tree control with all the units in the game and a list-box with all of the players.
To the right of the tree control is an Enable by Default checkbox. A unit marked as enabled will be available in games played on this map.
Initially, all units are available. To disable a unit for all players, select the unit in the tree control and then uncheck the Enable by Default checkbox.

Initially, all players are set to use the default settings for the availability of units, but you can modify unit availability for each player separately. To change the availability of a unit for one player, select the player in the list-box and select the unit in the tree-control. Then, uncheck the Use Defaults for Player checkbox. You can then check or uncheck the Enable for Player checkbox as appropriate.
The list-box updates automatically to show if a player is using the defaults for the selected unit and, if not, to show whether that unit has been enable or disabled for that player.

4) Player Settings: Upgrades
This panel lets you specify the default and maximum upgrade levels for each player. On the left side of the panel is a tree control with all the upgrades in the game and a list-box with all the players.
To the right of the tree control are the Default Level and Default Max fields. These let you set the initial upgrade levels and maximum upgrade levels available for each upgrade in the game. The Default Level is the upgrade level players will have at the beginning of the game. The Default Max is the highest upgrade level players will be allowed to research in the game.

Initially, the Default Level is set to zero, and the Default Max is set to the maximum for that upgrade.
To alter the default settings for an upgrade, select the upgrade in the tree control and then enter the Default Level and Default Max for that upgrade. To disable an upgrade entirely, set both the Default Level and Default Max fields to zero. These will be the default settings for all players.
Initially, all players are set to use the default settings for upgrades, but you can modify upgrade settings for each player separately. To alter these settings for one player, select the player in the list-box and select the upgrade in the tree control. Uncheck the Use Defaults for Player checkbox and then enter values for Default Level and Default Max.

The list-box updates automatically to show if a player is using the defaults for the selected upgrade and, if not, to show the custom Level and Max settings for that player.

5) Player Settings: Special Abilities
This panel lets you specify which special abilities are available to each player. On the left side of the panel is a tree control with all the special abilities in the game and a list-box with all the players.
To the right of the ability tree control is a set of radio buttons labeled Disabled, Enabled and Researched. Abilities set to disabled cannot be used in this map. Abilities set to enabled can be used once they have been researched during the game. Abilities set to researched can be used without additional research in the game.

Initially, all special abilities are set to enabled.
To alter the default settings for any special ability, select the special ability in the tree control and then select one of the three options for that ability: Disabled, Enabled or Researched.
Initially, all players are set to use the default settings for special abilities, but you can modify special ability settings for each player separately. To alter these settings for one player, select the player in the list-box and select the special ability in the tree control. Uncheck the Use Defaults for Player checkbox and then select a custom setting using one of the three radio buttons: Disabled, Enabled or Researched.

The list-box updates automatically to show if a player is using the defaults for the selected special ability and, if not, to show whether that ability has been enabled, disabled or researched for that player.

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Global Settings Tutorial:

1) Global Settings: Unit and Hero Settings
The Unit and Hero Settings dialog allows you to set hit points, shield values, costs and other settings for all the units in Starcraft.
From the Scenario menu, select Unit and Hero Settings.
This dialog contains a tree control listing of every unit in the game and provides fields for modifying their characteristics. Initially, all units are set to their defaults. To alter the settings for a unit, select it from the tree control and uncheck the Use Defaults checkbox.

Settings:
Hit Points - The maximum hit points for this unit.
Shields – For Protoss units, this value denotes the maximum shield value for the unit.
Armor – Armor is subtracted from damage caused by another unit. For example, a unit with an armor rating of 1 would subtract 1 point of damage from every attack against it.
Time – This is the time, in seconds, required to build the unit.
Minerals – This is the cost of the unit in minerals.

Gas – This is the cost of the unit in gas.
Ground Damage – This is how much damage the unit does in one ground attack. Some units deal damage twice per attack. Those units have the (x2) notice in the heading for this section (i.e. “Ground Damage (x2)”).
Ground Bonus – This is the amount by which damage increases every time you upgrade this unit’s ground attack.
Air Damage – This is how much damage the unit does in a single attack against air units. Some units deal damage twice per attack. Those units have the (x2) notice in the heading for this section (i.e. “Air Damage (x2)”).

Air Bonus - This is the amount by which damage increases every time you upgrade this unit’s air attack.
Hero Name – If the unit is a hero, you may change its name. Uncheck the Use Default checkbox and type in a name of your choice.

You may reset the settings for units at any time by pressing the Restore Defaults for All Units button.

2) Global Settings: Upgrade Settings
Upgrades allow players to enhance the existing capabilities of their units. This dialog allows you to set the cost and time it takes to develop any upgrade in Starcraft.
This dialog contains a tree control listing of every upgrade in the game and provides fields for modifying their costs in time and resources. Initially, all units are set to their defaults. To alter the settings for a unit, select it from the tree control and uncheck the Use Defaults checkbox.
Settings:

Time Cost: Base – This is the amount of time, in seconds, that it takes to research the initial upgrade or ability.
Time Cost: Factor – If this upgrade or ability can be improved more than once, this is the amount of additional time it will take each time you upgrade this ability.
Mineral Cost: Base – This is the cost, in minerals, that it takes to research the initial upgrade or ability.
Mineral Cost: Factor – If this upgrade or ability can be improved more than once, this is the additional cost, in minerals, for each upgrade of this ability.

Gas Cost: Base – This is the cost, in gas, that it takes to research the initial upgrade or ability.
Gas Factor: Factor – If this upgrade or ability can be improved more than once, this is the additional cost, in gas, for each upgrade of this ability.
You may reset the settings for upgrades at any time by pressing the Restore Defaults for All Upgrades button.

3) Global Settings: Special Ability Settings
Players can research additional abilities to give to their units. This dialog allows you to adjust the time required in researching the ability, its cost to research, and the energy cost to the unit using the ability.
This dialog contains a tree control that lists each ability in the game and provides fields for modifying their costs in time, resources and energy. Initially, all units are set to their defaults. To alter the settings for a unit, select it from the tree control and uncheck the Use Defaults checkbox.

Settings:
Time – This is the time it takes, in seconds, to research the ability.
Minerals – This is the cost, in minerals, to research the ability.
Gas – This is the cost, in gas, to research the ability.
Energy – This is the amount of energy used by a unit to activate the ability.

You may reset the defaults for special abilities at any time by pressing the Restore Defaults for All Abilities button.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Trigger Tutorial will come soon due to the complexity of triggers...

1 week from now complete tutorials in triggers and map polishing will come...

by jonadrian619
 

uberfoop

~=Admiral Stukov=~
That's a huge textwall saying the exact basics of the editor, the kinds of things that, if a person can't figure it out, they probably can't read a textwall.

Besides, there's a lot of vagueness in there. Not to mention much of the stuff is irrelevant and not true when using an advanced editor such as Starforge or SCXE which are required for making any decent map that will ever be played (with exception to melee maps which can be made good with regular staredit, but it's impossible to get a new melee map popular atm)
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
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  • The Helper The Helper:
    It is online though at night
  • The Helper The Helper:
    You would probably have to take a loan to get the Rice cert it is like 14l
  • The Helper The Helper:
    I was hoping you were going to say you wanted to be a cook and wished to open up a Food Truck there are so many opportunities for that here
  • The Helper The Helper:
    you can only open the bar if you sell food and a food truck in the parking lot counts
  • The Helper The Helper:
    here in houston
  • The Helper The Helper:
    most bars are struggling to build food prep and even some I know are doing there own food trucks
  • The Helper The Helper:
    but yeah man you should come to Houston there is so much more opportunity here than San Antonio. Just look at all the homeless people on the Riverwalk and downtown there you cannot even walk down the street without getting mobbed them
  • The Helper The Helper:
    check out this place apparently it is the best roommate site out there roommates.com lol
  • Varine Varine:
    The homeless people reminded me of New York
  • Varine Varine:
    I'll check it out, my lease expires in like a few months so I need to figure something out.
  • Varine Varine:
    I tried to open a food truck in Sandpoint a few years ago but the city said no, then like two years later they passed new laws to encourage it and gave them all fucking tax breaks and shit. And at that point I didn't have enough money to go buy one so I was way too late to the game once other cities realized they could just bring their existing truck there, or sell their brick and mortar.
  • Varine Varine:
    I do like food trucks though, they're way more fun than restaurants and usually I also get some of that tip money there.
  • Varine Varine:
    Restaurants are really hard if you don't have a back up source of income to fund them sometimes, in my experience most owners either got really really lucky, had existing money that allowed them to buy an already successful one, or they have family money to fall back on for loans. It's few and far between to see very inspiring success stories where the person actually got it through hard work and perseverance. I thought about opening one lots and I always just end up not thinking it'll work. I would much rather just find someone that has that money and go work for them
  • The Helper The Helper:
    i am not talking about opening a brick and mortar I am talking about food trucks though I have seen some brick and mortar mexican places open up during covid that are doing good because there food is awesome!
  • The Helper The Helper:
    Food trucks are killing out here because Bars cannot open unless they sell food and the governor ok'd the use of a food truck in front as serving food
  • The Helper The Helper:
    Just not enough food trucks
  • The Helper The Helper:
    a buddy of mine just opened up a food truck and he is killing it but he is a great cook and has awesome food right in the middle of the pandemic too food trucks are immune to pandemic because they are take out in Texas you will always be able to get take out or delivery
  • The Helper The Helper:
    He is in the different food facebook groups in houston and posts videos of him making his food
  • The Helper The Helper:
    he is killing it
  • jonas jonas:
    @Varine with the restaurants, there surely is a lot of luck and hard work but most restaurants fail because they suck. Flair isn't right, economics not well thought through, food is mediocre or sucks, location is bad, etc. If you're thinking about opening one, make sure you're looking at the stories of those that would be playing at your level, don't let your hopes be dragged down by all the subpar restaurants out there.
  • jonas jonas:
    I'm a bit worried about the future of data science, there's an influx of incompetent people hired by incompetent managers, that can't last. But I'm sure smart data scientists will always be useful and hireable. Same as smart security people.
  • jonas jonas:
    My sister in law worked in a vegan food truck, the owners were also making a killing, added several trucks and opened two restaurants over 5 years
  • Ghan Ghan:
    The CompTIA stuff is pretty much crap unfortunately. The places that ask for those low-level certs aren't likely places you want to work. For IT you really want a degree, but in the meantime you need to figure out some way to learn the skills. Cybersecurity is really hot right now so competition is fierce.
  • tom_mai78101 tom_mai78101:
    I realized I don't have anything much to say, other than "Good luck!". Compared to other places, I'm just very lucky we didn't have a lot of surges of cases coming in.

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