Report Study provides new details on the link between sexual satisfaction and vibrator use

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  1. tom_mai78101

    tom_mai78101 The Helper Connoisseur / Ex-MineCraft Host Staff Member

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    New research sheds light on the relationship between sexual satisfaction and vibrator use in women with male partners. The findings, which suggest that communication plays an important role, have been published in the journal Psychology & Sexuality.

    “This project started from us really wanting to come up with a fun collaboration for the two of us,” said study authors Stéphanie E. M. Gauvin (@GauvinSteph) and Lindsey R. Yessick (@LindseyYessick), who are both PhD candidates at Queen’s University.

    “We are both working under the supervision of Dr. Caroline Pukall but we come from different research perspectives. Much of Stéphanie’s research is more focused on relationship characteristics, with a focus on how individuals in relationships script their sexualities, and Lindsey’s research focuses on sensation and perception, with a particular interest in how vibrator use may change sensory functioning over time. Given how common vibrator use is and how little research there is in this area, this led us to the perfect collaboration!”


    The study, based on a survey of 488 women with male partners, found that women who used vibrators both alone and with a partner reported greater sexual satisfaction compared to those who only used a vibrator by themselves. Women who used vibrators in both contexts also perceived their sex life as having a better cost-to-reward ratio.

    “The most important takeaway from this paper is that it may be important to consider vibrator use during both solitary and partnered sexual activity. It appears that using a vibrator during both forms of sexual activity is related to experiencing more satisfaction in your sexual relationship and a more favourable balance of the ‘likes’ you receive in your relationship relative to ‘dislikes,'” Gauvin and Yessick told PsyPost.


    Read more here. (PsyPost)
     

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